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Metal-on-Metal Hip Devices

Patients unfortunate enough to require a hip replacement realize how important that joint is.  Whether by aging and arthritis, pathology, or accident – the painful deterioration of the hip joint reveals how much support and functioning those bones provide the body.  

When hip replacement surgery is indicated, an important consideration is the composition of the hip prothesis.  Because the hip is composed of moving parts (ball and socket), wear and biocompatibility of the material is critical. 

Since the first hip surgeries around 1840, ivory, rubber, silver plate and even glass were used to create the prosthesis. 

In recent history, four main types of materials have been used to create the ball and socket inserts of prosthetic hips: metal on polyethylene, metal on metal, ceramic on ceramic, and ceramic on polyethylene.  Of these, metal on metal has proven to be the most problematic.

These hip-replacement devices may deteriorate at faster rates, exposing patients to high levels of metals such as cobalt and chromium.

Claims are being investigated involving:

  • DePuy® Orthopaedics ASR™ XL Acetabular Hip Replacement System (implanted between 2005 and 2010)
  • Stryker® Rejuvenate
  • Stryker® ABG II Modular-Neck Hip Stems
  • Stryker® LFIT V40 Femoral Head
  • Wright Medical Technology Hip Replacements (Conserve®, Dynasty®, Profemur® and Lineage® line of products)

If you received a metal hip implant and experienced symptoms or side effects requiring a revision or replacement surgery, do not release any medical information to the hip replacement manufacturer representatives or sign a release before speaking to a lawyer. If you are told that you need hip revision surgery, make sure that the removed component parts are preserved and consult your counsel to ensure they are saved correctly. Please call Putnam Law at 402 505-3555 to discuss your legal options.